Family therapy in iran a case study of obsessive-compulsive disorder

Video Transcript Transcript for Medical Treatment of Obsessive Compulsive Disorder After four months at home paralyzed by fear or afraid other students -- -- contaminated. Dorm rooms -- and read -- Felt like old tonight get back -- war scenes like I can do it she's crossed the first big -- she's there -- collapsed.

Family therapy in iran a case study of obsessive-compulsive disorder

Research on attachment has shed new light on understanding one of the underlying mechanisms of psychopathology in children. The aim of this study was to investigate the therapeutic efficacy of attachment-based intervention in a pediatric sample with obsessive-compulsive disorder OCD.

Twelve participants, years of age, were treated across an eight-week period. They had not been treated with either pharmacotherapy or psychotherapy previously and remained medication-free during the attachment-based therapy. This study comprised two groups of children: The experimental group, who received attachment-based intervention, and the control group, who did not receive treatment.

All participants were assessed in terms of severity of OCD symptoms by administrating the Children's Yale-Brown Obsessive-Compulsive Scale before and after the experimental group had received the therapeutic sessions. The children were assessed again one month later.

The authors review Islamic-based strategies and describe family therapy with a culturally specific case of childhood obsessive-compulsive disorder. Family therapy, adapted to integrated, religious-based cognitive behavior therapy seems appropriate for clients who are served in Iran. Family Therapy in Iran: A Case Study of Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder culturally specific case of childhood obsessive-compulsive disorder. Family therapy, adapted to integrated, religious. The study examines predictors of treatment response in pediatric obsessive-compulsive disorder, which is a severe mental illness causing distress and impaired functioning. Summarized findings of psychosocial factors and medication interventions are presented.

Multivariate analysis of covariance MANCOVA indicated that the OCD symptoms in children decreased significantly over the course of the therapy, and this gain was maintained at follow-up.

The results of this study demonstrated that the attachment-based intervention was efficacious in alleviating the OCD symptoms. It is suggested that parental instruction in attachment-based relationships may help prevent young children from developing OCD symptoms in middle-childhood and adulthood.

It involves cognitive and behavioral symptoms that include obsessive thoughts and ritualistic or avoidant behavior. Obsessions, in this disorder, are persistent ideas, thoughts, impulses or images that are experienced as intrusive and inappropriate. Compulsions are repetitive behaviors or mental acts, the goal of which is to prevent or reduce anxiety or distress.

Ginsburg and Schlossberg[ 5 ] demonstrated that parental over-control and over-protection, less authoritative parenting, parental reinforcement or modeling of anxious or avoidant behavior, and negative parental expectations concerning their child, elevate the risk of anxiety disorders in children.

Similarly, Johnson, et al. This study indicated that family interactions contribute more than biological predisposition to the etiology of psychopathology. Other family interaction risk factors that predict the development of OCD include marital discord and family disorganization,[ 7 ] family copying style, parent—child enmeshment, and involvement of rituals.

Some interventions are biological in nature, such as, the use of serotonin reuptake inhibitors e. An alternative to FCBT, proposed for treating OCD in children, is narrative family therapy, and the efficacy of this approach also has been experimentally supported.

Based on the assumed importance of attachment relationships, such approaches emphasize the role of parental acceptance, control, and modeling, in maintaining children's anxiety symptoms.

Attachment refers to the emotional bond that arises early between infant and primary caregiver. This bond is marked by the child seeking out of this specific attachment figure in times of need e.

The attachment theory suggests that when parental behavior fails to make children feel safe, secure, and able to trust the parents in times of need, then children will be less able to regulate their emotions and fulfill their needs adaptively.

Consequently, they tend to develop negative, insecure views of themselves and others, which puts them at a risk of developing psychological disorders.

He maintained that the attachment theory could also provide a useful framework for therapeutic interventions. There has been a growing consensus that attachment is an ongoing process, which becomes organized and reorganized at each stage of development, in keeping with new maturational and experiential opportunities.

Myhr, Sookman, and Pinard[ 27 ] postulated that insecure attachment may predispose children to develop OCD. Consistent with this proposal, Sunderland[ 28 ] has reported that attachment insecurity is a risk factor for pediatric OCD. Doron and Kyrios[ 29 ] found that insecure attachment in adults is also associated with OCD.

Using a cross-sectional design, Doron et al. The profoundly adverse effects of OCD on many aspects of individual lives, together with the evidence that attachment problems can heighten vulnerability to OCD symptoms, highlights the potential value of a therapy for pediatric OCD, designed to enhance the attachment relationship between such children and their parents.

The aim of the present study is to determine the effectiveness of attachment-based intervention in treating children's OCD. We hypothesized that attachment-based intervention would be effective in decreasing OCD symptoms in children. According to Geller et al.

The obsession and compulsion severity scores are derived by summing the five items in each subscale, and a total score is derived by summing all the ten items.

This measure has good reliability and validity, and a high degree of internal consistency. This measure has good validity and reliability. It contains two scales: As the association between parenting and OCD symptoms is the focus of interest in this study, participants have been assessed using only the parent attachment scale.

The items on this scale assess three dimensions of attachment:Family Therapy in Iran: A Case Study of Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder culturally specific case of childhood obsessive-compulsive disorder.

Family therapy, adapted to integrated, religious. Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder: A Case Study Predisposing factors Perpetuating factors Precipitating factors Patterns Long history of . The authors review Islamic-based strategies and describe family therapy with a culturally specific case of childhood obsessive-compulsive disorder.

Family therapy, adapted to integrated, religious-based cognitive behavior therapy seems appropriate for clients who are served in Iran. 4 Mohammad Khodayarifard, James McClenon, Family Therapy in Iran: A Case Study of Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder, Journal of Multicultural Counseling and Development, , 39, .

Psychotherapy in Iran: A case study of cognitive-behavioral family therapy for Mrs.

Family therapy in iran a case study of obsessive-compulsive disorder

A. Journal of Clinical Psychology, 63, Koenig, H. G. (). The healing power of faith: How belief and prayer can help you triumph over disease. Since family structure is considered as a very salient factor in its individual's life and well-being, interventions that support family cohesion by involving family members can .

Family therapy in iran a case study of obsessive-compulsive disorder
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